The Wisdom of Tyler Durden

posted this over at Roosh’s. some of my favorite passages from the book-

And you open the door and you step inside
We’re inside our hearts
Now imagine your pain as a white ball of healing light
That’s right, your pain
The pain itself is a white ball of healing light
I don’t think so

This is your life, good to the last drop
Doesn’t get any better than this
This is your life and it’s ending one minute at a time

This isn’t a seminar, this isn’t a weekend retreat
Where you are now you can’t even imagine what the bottom will be like
Only after disaster can we be resurrected
It’s only after you’ve lost everything that you’re free to do anything
Nothing is static, everything is appaling, everything is falling apart

This is your life, this is your life, this is your life, this is your life
Doesn’t get any better than this
This is your life, this is your life, this is your life, this is your life
And it and it’s ending one-minute at a time

You are not a beautiful and unique snowflake
You are the same decaying organic matter as everything else
We are all part of the same compost heap
We are the all singing, all dancing, crap of the world

You are not your bank account
You are not the clothes you wear
You are not the contents of your wallet
You are not your bowel cancer
You are not your grande latte
You are not the car you drive
You are not your fucking khaki’s

You have to give up, you have to give up
You have to realize that someday you will die
Until you know that, you are useless

I say let me never be complete
I say may I never be content
I say deliver me from Swedish furniture
I say deliver me from clever arts
I say deliver me from clear skin and perfect teeth
I say you have to give up
I say evolve, and let the chips fall where they may

This is your life, this is your life, this is your life, this is your life
Doesn’t get any better than this
This is your life, this is your life, this is your life, this is your life
And it and it’s ending one-minute at a time

You have to give up, you have to give up
I want you to hit me as hard as you can
I want you to hit me as hard as you can

Welcome to Fight Club
If this is your first night, you have to fight. [edit-baptism by fire]


29 Comments on “The Wisdom of Tyler Durden”

  1. Sis says:

    So if he is free from everything, what’s the point? What’s left? Freedom in and of itself is not enough. Courage without a cause is pointless. There has to be a worthy cause, something greater than himself.

    • dannyfrom504 says:

      It’s his commenting on the current materialistic lifestyle and the demasculinization of modern men. Look it’s a dark book. But by and large it’s a statement about the hopelessness of today’s men.

      Did you read the book or see the movie?

      The point was that the protagonist created Tyler (who becomes his alter ego) to unplug from the cubicle drone he has become.

      His worthy cause was that he found salvation via hitting bottom and redefined himself based on individuality and NOT his job or possessions.

      Sent from my iPhone

    • Altimanix says:

      What if there is no worthy cause though?

      Should men just sign up as spear catchers for society (women and the rich)?

      First you must know yourself, own yourself, then you can pick a cause, if YOU choose that it is worth your investment, Modern society is raising men to be PUAs, MGTOWs or nihilists – chaque a son gout. If society wants investment from men, it needs to earn it.

      It’s a great film on many levels…and obviously, the book that it came from is even better

      • dannyfrom504 says:

        The “worthy cause” is subjective. There HAS to be something you’re passionate about. And if not, get busy dying.

        Sent from my iPhone

      • Altimanix says:

        @Danny
        yep, I agree

        society is waking up to the fact that men aren’t just signing up to the old deal anymore – dey gone took da red-pill in some way, shape or form. Good on ‘em

  2. Vicomte says:

    Look up into the stars and you’re gone.

  3. Vicomte says:

    Fiiiiine. The ol’ fashioned way:

    Quoting Fight Club out of context completely perverts the message of the book.

    While all of this sounds cool (It’s supposed to) it’s really all bullshit. Tyler’s philosophy is to abuse yourself so you can give up and become free (a Space Monkey, push a button, pull a lever and never know why).

    It’s the exact parallel of the modern materialist life he’s railing against here.

    They both take you to the same place. Cubicle Drone and Space Monkey.

    Even Tyler knows Tyler is dangerous and full of shit.

    • dannyfrom504 says:

      Sorry, but agree to disagree.

      I watch the guys that have been in as long as I have, and they are completely institutionalized.

      I feel fortunate that I can disconnect from my job and not let it define me.

      And since you brought it up- what is your perspective on the message of the book?

      Sent from my iPhone

      • Vicomte says:

        Choose your Gods and Prophets carefully.

        Or, preferably, not at all.

        • dannyfrom504 says:

          Tyler- “We’re a generation of men raised by women, I’m beginning to wonder if another woman is what we need.”

          Ed- “I’m a 30 year old boy.”

          What I love most about fight club is it’s multi faceted subject matter that applies to men. You say tomay-to, I say tomah-to.

          Sent from my iPhone

  4. Zorro says:

    We are a generation of men raised by women. Read the first two chapters of No More Mr Nice Guy by Dr. Robert Glover.

    That book’s first two chapters blew my fucking doors open.

  5. Altimanix says:

    You forgot

    “We are a generation raised by women. I’m wondering if another woman is the answer.” -Tyler

  6. Athor Pel says:

    I have some idea what it means to become institutionalized but could you give some examples?

    I’ll list some of what I’m thinking of.

    You are institutionalized if:

    You find it hard or impossible to imagine not getting your government check every month.

    Not having access to the chow hall would make you nervous.

    You will gladly go to work for a large corporation that has a similar corporate culture to the service branch you are about to separate from.

    You would find yourself bereft of direction in your life if someone wasn’t there daily to tell you what you needed to do.

    You would have a hard time figuring out what to do next career wise if the service didn’t present you with its limited set of alternatives suited to your military skillset.

    Or said another way, you have a hard time figuring out what you want to do with your life rather than letting the service decide for you.

    Making friends that aren’t already in the service is something you haven’t had to do for close to 20 years and you have a hard time imagining what you will have in common with civilians. In fact it kind of scares you.

    It all boils down to feeling fear for life after the enlistment ends.

    • dannyfrom504 says:

      No. To me it means being broken by a system to the point you can’t exist apart from said system.

      Take a man imprisoned for 40 year then given parole, it’s very unlikely he’ll be able to adjust to the outside world.

      Sent from my iPhone

      • Athor Pel says:

        The only difference between what I see us saying is that I’m using the word ‘hard’ to describe a guy’s effort to adjust to the outside world and I see you describing a state where it is impossible for the guy to adjust.

        Does that sound right?

  7. Vicomte says:

    I call them love apples.


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